Hubot was WAY ahead of it’s time. 1200 word vocabulary, voice recognition, 300 baud modem for roughly the price of a car ($3,500) back in 1983.
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Hubot was WAY ahead of it’s time. 1200 word vocabulary, voice recognition, 300 baud modem for roughly the price of a car ($3,500) back in 1983.
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Hubot was WAY ahead of it’s time. 1200 word vocabulary, voice recognition, 300 baud modem for roughly the price of a car ($3,500) back in 1983.

Dating from August of 1983, these are concept sketches for a modular design approach to the Heathkit HERO 2000.
1. Base - drive motors, batteries2. Torso - computer card cage and arm3. Head - user interface and sensors

Not many changes were made to the actual prototype. Once development was completed, the HERO 2000 was the world’s most advanced educational robot.

Dating from August of 1983, these are concept sketches for a modular design approach to the Heathkit HERO 2000.

1. Base - drive motors, batteries
2. Torso - computer card cage and arm
3. Head - user interface and sensors

Not many changes were made to the actual prototype. Once development was completed, the HERO 2000 was the world’s most advanced educational robot.

This Popular Mechanics 1984 concept illustration  portrays the inner workings of a scratch built personal robot called Ultima by Tom Carroll. While the image isn’t entirely accurate, the robot’s ‘ultimate’ claim to fame was eating batteries for dinner, or at least rapidly discharging them.

This Popular Mechanics 1984 concept illustration  portrays the inner workings of a scratch built personal robot called Ultima by Tom Carroll. While the image isn’t entirely accurate, the robot’s ‘ultimate’ claim to fame was eating batteries for dinner, or at least rapidly discharging them.